Letter to Mabel Dodge from Mina Loy: 1921

Letter to Mabel Dodge from Mina Loy resquesting funding.JPG
Beinecke_DL_9999027.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Letter to Mabel Dodge from Mina Loy: 1921

Subject

Sex, Gender, Marriage, and the New Woman
Art, Modernism, and Bohemia

Description

Dodge occupies a dual role as not only a patroness but also an active part of Bohemia -- though she always exists on the fringe of being a true artist because of the economic and social status given to her by her aristocratic background. Burke described her as having “a background of wealth with bohemian inclinations,” which conveys how the help Dodge provides artists like Loy is different and higher impact than a typical patroness. Loy confides in Dodge and is comfortable enough that she can admit to Dodge, “Will you help me? I am so poor.” Loy goes on to relay to Dodge her aspirations to own a restaurant. For a woman to own a restaurant is also somewhat fantastical for a time when women had a hard time even taking custody of children after a divorce, conveying Dodge’s role as a confidant. By being able to hold radical ideologies while also possessing economic power, Dodge promotes and furthers the ideal of Bohemia in a unique and radical way. Loy is just one example of someone who received funds and support from Dodge; Dodge has records of sending money to everyone from Upton Sinclair to Edna Saint Vincent Millay.

Loy, Mina. Letter to Mabel Dodge. July 1921. MS. Mabel Dodge Luhan Collection.
Beinecke Library, New Haven.

Creator

Mina Loy

Source

Mabel Dodge Luhan Collection

Publisher

Beinecke Library

Date

1921 July 3

Contributor

Mabel Dodge

Rights

Mabel Dodge Luhan Collection

Format

Image of Letter

Language

English

Type

Correspondence

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

My dearest Moose I was so surprised to get your note—know I wish to see you.
Moose—will you help me? I never get to write because I am so poor. I was to take the Italian woman who used to be my cook and start a little Restaurant in Paris—where I can get friends to room with. I could make enough to keep the children and myself free of this daily anxiety. I suppose this is a ridiculous thing to ask after all these years but I was so wondering what to do. I have suffered so much since the War to keep them going, I want to be free of worry—and I have so much accumulated that needs expression—would you lend a thousand dollars to be paid back in two years to help me start a Restaurant. When I get it started you shall have yours.
Are you ever coming to Europe Again? Shall I ever see you Moose? – if you find it in your heart to help me in this dark hopeless moment please send me the word year and by deferred cable to ‘Cooks’ Fifth Ave! I am trying to get over as soon as possible to begin.
Loy, Mina. Letter to Mabel Dodge. July 1921. MS. Mabel Dodge Luhan Collection.
Beinecke Library, New Haven.

Original Format

Written letter